Follies

fol·ly noun, plural fol·lies 1.the state or quality of being foolish; lack of understanding or sense. 2.a foolish action, practice, idea, etc.; absurdity: the folly of performing without a rehearsal. 3.a costly and foolish undertaking; unwise investment or expenditure. 4.Architecture . a whimsical or extravagant structure built to serve as a conversation piece, lend interest to a view, commemorate a person or event, etc.: found especially in England in the 18th century. 5.follies, a theatrical revue. Origin: 1175–1225; Middle English folie  < Old French,  derivative of fol, fou  foolish, mad. The BBC's Mark Easton published a report this week in which he revealed the extent of perceived mental illness within England that is treated with anti-depressants.  It seems that in several areas of the country prescription is the first response to any sort of anxiety … Continue reading Follies

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And did those feet…

I read with interest this week that Wales lags only slightly behind the USA in terms of the levels of obesity in the population, and at first assumed that the rest of the UK must therefore be in a similar predicament, but discovered that in England at least the NHS is prepared to intervene sooner … Continue reading And did those feet…