I don’t feel a particular sense of nostalgia.

There’s no obvious hankering for past glories.

And yet, when I look at the images I’ve shot and processed this week the evidence suggests otherwise.  My daughter Holly has appeared here before, but meeting her for lunch this weekend to mark the end of her ‘A’ levels and consequently her school life made accompanying pictures an inevitability.  Combining a co-operative disposition with photogenic features she has grown accustomed to the large black device that imposes itself on many an occasion.  As if this wasn’t enough, the lighting in the bar where we met was perfect for some moody (and not so moody) imagery.

On my way to meet her I passed another old friend, and as I couldn’t recall having taken images here in bright sunshine, the Angel got a repeat visit too.

And when the weekend was over and normal life resumed, where was I but Carlisle airport again, where the brooding bomber begged for a wide-angle treatment that I didn’t give it last time I was here.APW_2527_HDR-Edit

Original images, but of well-photographed subjects.

I can’t help but gather new pictures wherever I go, and this compulsive nature means that I have tens of thousands of photographs to store, and I’ve recently been forced to move my entire library to a new hard drive, prompting me to do a little pruning of people and places who time has shown I have no need to revisit.

It was in doing this, that I came across a shot I took in Keswick several years ago.  A candid of a couple embracing that had a dance like quality, which appealed to me and several friends at the time.  To give them greater emphasis within the image I had applied some blurring to the picture, removing other people who would have been distractions as a result.  Although I had a small jpeg copy, I’d assumed the original file was long-lost, but discovered it again this week.

It wasn’t too sharp (this was before I’d switched to the big guns of my Canon 5d‘s (apologies for the pun) so the resolution was limited, and my own skills probably were less developed then too.  Finding the original file gave me the chance to try to sharpen it up a little in post processing, though of course if the detail wasn’t there in the first place  there is only so much you can do.

When it came to applying the blur effect, I was reminded that the newest version of Photoshop includes something called spin blur, so it was time to give it a try to see what it had to offer.  Bingo.  More of the other people in the picture were rendered as abstract shapes, leaving the “dancers” centre stage, though now they were a point of stillness with the world spinning around them.  Maybe that’s more appropriate; I don’t see this couple being fans of the Average White Band*.

There is a quote attributed to Leonardo along the lines of “Art is never finished, only abandoned.” which was paraphrased by Pixar studios when they said “Our films don’t get finished, they just get released.”.

I don’t really see myself in the company of Leonardo or Lasseter, but I think they had a point.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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